Panelists  (Listed in alphabetical order)

Michael A. De Miranda, Ph.D.
James Hone
Joseph S. Krajcik
Frances P. Lawrenz
Teri W. Odom
Jim W. Pellegrino
John D. Ristvey, Jr.
Linda S. Schadler

 

Michael A. De Miranda, Ph.D.

Professor, Engineering Education in the School of Education and College of Engineering
Colorado State University

Michael De Miranda's expertise in engineering and technology education focuses in the areas related to curriculum selection and use of cognitively-based instructional strategies, materials, and activities that support the integration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K-12 classrooms. In addition to serving as an international consultant and workshop provider in over 9 different countries, Professor De Miranda has made numerous presentations at regional national, and international conferences.

 

James Hone

Department of Mechanical Engineering and NSEC, Columbia University

James Hone is currently Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia University . He received his PhD in experimental condensed matter physics from UC Berkeley in 1998, and did postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania and Caltech, where he was a Millikan Fellow. He joined the Columbia faculty in 2003. His current research interests include, synthesis, characterization, manipulation, and applications of carbon nanotubes; graphene; nanomechanical devices; and nano-biology.

 

Joseph S. Krajcik

Professor, Science Education and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Education
the University of Michigan

Joseph S. Krajcik, a Professor of Science Education and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Education at the University of Michigan, works with teachers in science classrooms to bring about sustained change by creating classroom environments in which students find solutions to important intellectual questions that subsume essential learning goals and use learning technologies as productivity tools. He seeks to discover the depth of student learning in such environments, as well as to explore and find solutions to challenges that teachers face in enacting such complex instruction. In collaboration with colleagues from Northwestern University , American Association of Science, and Michigan State , Joe, through funding from the NSF, is a principle investigator in a materials development project that aims to design, develop and test the next generation of middle school curriculum materials to engage students in obtaining deep understandings of science content and practices. Professor Krajcik has authored and co-authored over 100 manuscripts and makes frequent presentations at international, national and regional conferences that focus on his research as well as presentations that translate research findings into classroom practice. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and served as president of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching in 1999. Joe co-directs the IDEA Institute and Center for Highly Interactive Classrooms, Curriculum and Computing in Education (hi-ce) at the University of Michigan and is a co-principle investigator in the National Center for Learning and Teaching Nanoscale Science and Engineering. In 2002, Professor Krajcik was honored to receive a Guest Professorship from Beijing Normal University in Beijing , China . In winter 2005, Joe was the Weston Visiting Professor of Science Education at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot , Israel . Before obtaining his Ph.D. in Science Education, Joe taught high school chemistry for seven years in Milwaukee , Wisconsin . He received a Ph.D. in Science Education from the University of Iowa in 1986. His home page is located at: http://www.umich.edu/~krajcik . His project web sites include: http://hice.org and http://hice.org/IQWST .

 

Frances P. Lawrenz

Psychological foundations and quantitative methods in education
Associate vice president for research, University of Minnesota

Dr. Lawrenz is the Associate Vice President for Research at the University of Minnesota and the Wallace Professor of Teaching and Learning in Department of Educational Psychology at the University. She has served as Assistant Vice President for Research and Associate Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota, as Associate Dean for Research in the College of Education and Human Development, as Department Chair of Educational Psychology, as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa, and as senior evaluation and science education specialist at the National Science Foundation. She has numerous publications including 90 refereed publications, 29 monographs/ chapters, four curriculum projects and 175 evaluation reports. She presently is working on five funded evaluation projects.

 

Teri W. Odom

Associate Professor and Dow Chemical Company Research Professor
Department of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University

Teri W. Odom received her B.S. degree from Stanford University in 1996 and her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2001. She joined Northwestern in 2002 and was the inaugural recipient of the Dow Teacher-Scholar Award. Odom has received a Research Innovation Award (Research Corporation, 2002), the Victor K. LaMer Award (ACS Surface Science and Colloids, 2003), and the National Science Foundation's CAREER Award (2004). She was also named as one of MIT Technology Review's Top 100 Innovators in 2004. Odom is a David and Lucile Packard Fellow (2003), an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (2005), and a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation (2005). In 2006, she was awarded the ExxonMobil Solid State Chemistry Faculty Fellowship, and in 2007, she was awarded the Rohm and Haas New Faculty Award. Odom 's research focuses on controlling materials at the 100-nm scale and investigating their size and shape-dependent properties. Specifically, she has developed multi-scale nanoscale patterning tools that can generate new types of noble metal (plasmonic) structures that can manipulate light at the nanoscale. In addition, she has pioneered a new area called chemical nanofabrication, which combines chemistry and fabrication to assemble functional nanomaterials.  

 

Jim W. Pellegrino

Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor and Distinguished Professor of Education
the University of Illinois at Chicago

James W. Pellegrino is Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor and Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also serves as Co-director of UIC's interdisciplinary Learning Sciences Research Institute. Dr. Pellegrino's research and development interests focus on children's and adult's thinking and learning and the implications of cognitive research and theory for assessment and instructional practice. Much of his current work is focused on analyses of complex learning and instructional environments, including those incorporating powerful information technology tools, with the goal of better understanding the nature of student learning and the conditions that enhance deep understanding. A special concern of his research is the incorporation of effective formative assessment practices, assisted by technology, to maximize student learning and understanding. He has authored or co-authored over 250 books, chapters, journal articles, and reports in the areas of cognition, instruction and assessment and has made numerous invited presentations at local, state, national and international meetings and at universities throughout the world. Dr. Pellegrino's unique blend of expertise which combines knowledge of cognitive science, psychometrics, educational technology, instructional practice, and educational policy has led to appointment as head of several National Academy of Science/National Research Council study committees. These include chair of the Study Committee for the Evaluation of the National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, co-chair of the NRC/NAS Study Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and co-chair of the NRC/NAS Study Committee on the Foundations of Assessment which issued the report Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. He was a member of the NRC/NAS/NAE Study Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology and chaired the NRC/NAS Panel on Research on Learning and Instruction for the Strategic Education Research Partnership. Most recently he completed service as a member of the NRC/NAS Study Committee on Test Design for K-12 Science Achievement. He is a lifetime National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council. He was recently elected to lifetime membership in the National Academy of Education.

 

John D. Ristvey, Jr.

Principal Consultant, Education and Public Outreach
Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL)

John D. Ristvey, Jr. Manages Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning  (McREL)'s education and public outreach (E / PO) team. He specializes in technical and science education expertise, instructional materials design, and professional development. Mr. Ristvey holds an M.S. in Secondary Science Education from the University of Houston-Clear Lake, Texas and a B.S. in Biology from Grove City College, Pennsylvania along with certifications in teaching secondary science. A Principal Consultant at McREL, he is responsible for managing the work and resources of multiple contracts including education and public outreach for NASA's Dawn mission with UCLA, EPOXI mission with University of Maryland, and Stardust/NEXT mission with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has also managed contracts for Marshall Space Flight Center, Disney Educational Productions, and the ABC News Classroom Edition. Mr. Ristvey is currently the PI for a National Science Foundation-funded instructional materials development project, A NanoLeap into New Science (# ESI-0426401), which is translating current nanoscale science and technology research into content appropriate for high school students.

 

Linda S. Schadler

Professor, Materials Science and Engineering Department
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Dr. Linda S. Schadler joined Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1996 and is currently a full Professor in Materials Science and Engineering. She graduated from Cornell University in 1985 with a B.S. in materials science and engineering and received a PhD in materials science and engineering in 1990 from the University of Pennsylvania. After two years of post-doctoral work at IBM Yorktown Heights, Schadler served as a faculty member at Drexel University in Philadelphia, PA before coming to Rensselaer.